Privacy and cookies
Images of Italy
Italy home Accommodation Airports Travel & transport Italy map Planning a trip Language Tours & packages Discover Italy
Destinations: Where to go in Italy & what to do there Holiday ideas: Itineraries, seaside resorts, islands, the best hotels ... Special interest: Activities, spas, art, cruises, events ...

Rome Venice Florence Sicily Amalfi Coast Italian Lakes Cinque Terre Tuscany Milan Verona Sorrento Puglia Sardinia More places



Gardens & ruins
Gardens of Ninfa
Villa Lante, Bagnaia
Villa d'Este, Tivoli
Hadrian's Villa, Tivoli
Villa Gregoriana, Tivoli
Terracina temple




Castel Gandolfo

Castel Gandolfo, Lazio

A pretty hill-town perched high above Lake Albano (Lago di Albano), Castel Gandolfo is just a few miles south of Rome, and is the summer residence of the Pope Restaurant terrace, Castel Gandolfo

Castel Gandolfo is one of the Castelli Romani, historic towns dotted around the wooded Alban Hills and dominated by grand villas. The summer residence of the Pope, Castel Gandolfo is little more than a pretty village clustered around the Papal Palace and the extensive gardens enjoyed by popes for centuries. It was a particular favourite of John Paul II, and one of the first acts of his successor, Benedict XVI was to thank the people of Castel Gandolfo and assure them that he, too, would be spending his summers in their "beautiful little town" above Lake Albano.

Much of Castel Gandolfo is discreetly dedicated to the various Pontifical villas and religious foundations. The Papal Palace - with astronomical observatory attached - dominates Piazza della LibertÓ, but other locations, like the sprawling papal gardens, are tucked away out of sight.

The papal tradition of spending summer here dates back to Pope Urban VIII (1623-1644). However, it wasn't the first time that an important Roman had summered on this spot; the pontifical gardens of the seventeenth-century Villa Barberini cover the site of a villa belonging to the Roman Emperor Domitian. The Pope's gardens are truly spectacular, but sadly not open to the general public. With splendid views reaching over the plain to the sea, they contain extensive formal areas, farmland and a large chamber dating back to the time of Domitian.

On the attractive main square, Piazza della LibertÓ, the church of San Tommaso di Villanova, designed by Bernini, sits opposite the palace gateway. As well as a couple of cafes, there are also a few shops selling local produce and tourist fripperies in the piazza, perhaps with an eye to the faithful who arrive on summer Sundays to see the Pope.

Castel Gandolfo, with the Papal Palace and observatory

Castel Gandolfo is a sleepy little place, but although there's not a great deal for tourists to see, it's a pleasant spot to spend a few relaxing hours. There are some good places to eat, including the panoramic terraces of the Ristorante Bucci (pictured). The area is renowned for its local produce, and several establishments offer you the chance to taste and buy wine, meat and other local specialities. The town is picturesque, offering good photo-opportunities and a chance to appreciate Italian small-town atmosphere. It's hard to believe you are just a few miles from Rome as you admire the peaceful lake views or wander the tiny lanes.

There is a tourist information kiosk (limited opening) close to the piazza (under an arch and down a slope) on Via Massimo d'Azeglio. Some decent public toilets are located below the piazza, overlooking Lake Albano. To reach Castel Gandolfo station, descend the zig-zag footpath helpfully called Via della Stazione.

The town has a peach festival, the Sagra delle Pesche, on the third Sunday in July. The patron saint is San Sebastiano, whose saint's day is celebrated in September.

Castel Gandolfo transport

Castel Gandolfo is 15 miles from Rome and can be reached by bus from Anagnina Metro station, or by train from Rome's Termini station. Trains are infrequent, but the journey is very scenic. The station is halfway up the slope above Lake Albano (be alert as the station is not clearly announced or signed). A steep path zigzags uphill to the town, emerging just below the main square. It's quite a climb.

The train and buses connect the town with the rest of the Castelli Romani. The enterprising could try walking to nearby Albano (along the wooded main road above the lake; 25 minutes then a steep drop into Albano) or down to the lakeshore and Marino. However, the roads are designed for cars and not pedestrians, so it's not a particularly enjoyable or safe walk.

Castel Gandolfo accommodation

In the historic heart of Castel Gandolfo is Hotel Castel Gandolfo - a well-reviewed hotel with lake views.


On this site

Castelli Romani

Frascati

Rome

Lazio transport


Useful external links

Castel Gandolfo hotels (Venere)

Castel Gandolfo hotels (Venere)



Advertising
Advertising
Read Blog
Italy Heaven © Copyright Tourist Heaven Limited
This site provides tourist and visitor information for Italy, from Piemonte to Sicily. Designed for travellers from around the world who want to plan a trip, take a holiday, book accommodation in Italy, or just learn more about the country: its geography, art, football, culture and entertainment options.